TOOLBOX TALK 04/60
TOPIC: OPERATION GENERAL FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
OBJECTIVE: TO PROMOTE AWARNESS OF THE DANGERS OF FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS


Some things to know before you give your talk.

  • As supervisor, you should let your crew know a fact that surprises a lot of people about flammable liquids. And that fact is that it is the vapor rising from the liquid that burns, not the liquid itself.
  • When flammable vapor mixes with air and a flame or spark ignition occurs.
  • Whether the result of ignition is a fire or an explosion depends on the circumstances. In a closed space with the right mix, the burning is so violent that the sides of the building or the can are torn open.

 

Here are a few scenarios:

  • A mechanic decided to cut the end out of a 44-gallon drum that had been used for storing jet fuel. There was hardly any liquid but there was enough vapor and air in the drum to cause an explosion.
  • A fire occurred while a mechanic was angle grinding a piece of metal and sparks fell into a tray of thinners.
  • An explosion happened during spray painting of a storage space in the workshops.

 

Tell your crew that explosions can be prevented by:

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  • Steam cleaning drums, tanks or containers before a torch is used on them.
  • Providing enough ventilation to remove flammable vapours.

 

Questions you can use to get them talking:

  • Has anyone ever had an accident – or know of one – involving flammable liquids?
  • What should you do if you suspect an area has a build-up of flammable vapours?

 

Hazard classification for flammable liquids
Class Flash Point Boiling Point Examples
I-A Below 23°C Below 38°C Diethyl ether, Pentane, Ligroin, Petroleum ether
I-B Below 23°C At or above 38°C Acetone, Benzene, Cyclohexane, Ethanol
I-C 24-38°C ――― p-xylene

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